ENGL 385 A: Modernism/modernity

Embodied Modernism

Meeting Time: 
MW 2:30pm - 4:20pm
Location: 
CDH 101
SLN: 
14171
Instructor:
Jessica Burstein
Jessica Burstein

Syllabus Description:

Professor Burstein    Modernism/Modernity: Embodied Modernism English 385A Fall 2014

Condon 101 M/W 2:30-4:20  Office Hours: Padelford A502  Monday 12-2

Course Description: War, Fashion, Big Cities, and Sex: all four are embattled terrain, if not constitutive features, of modernity. This class gives the student a grounding in foundational literary and non-literary modernist texts, alongside an emphasis on the body as it appears in literature and prose of the period. We will track changing depictions of sexuality with the emergence of the New Woman, Dorian Gray's relentless quest for new sensations, the "invention" of shell shock as a form of trauma, sartorial fashion, and urban experience. We will read novels, modern poetry, some manifestos, one popular best-seller of the 1920s, and  close-read one great painting by the Impressionist Edouard Manet that mingles advertising, prostitution, sensual pleasure, the (proto-) little black dress, and urban spectacle. 

Texts:

Packet: readings starred with an asterisk are in the packet, available at The Ave Copy Shop, 4141 University Way.

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891) Norton Critical Edition, ed. Michael Patrick Gillespie ISBN: 0393927547

Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion (1927) Ed. Martin Stannard. (2nd edition; Norton Critical Ed.) ISBN-10: 039392792X; ISBN-13: 978-0393927924

Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier (1918) Penguin USA (Paper); ISBN: 014118065X

Mina Loy, The Lost Lunar Baedeker (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, ISBN 0-374-52507-2

Michael Arlen, The Green Hat (Cappuchin Classics: ISBN-10: 0955519659

ISBN-13: 978-0955519659)

Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway (Mariner Books; 1st Harvest/HBJ ed edition ISBN-10: 0156628708; ISBN-13: 978-0156628709)

Will Self, Dorian: An Imitation (Grove Press, 0802140475)

 

Additional Details:

War, Fashion, Big Cities, and Sex: all four are embattled terrain, if not constitutive features, of modernity. This class gives the student a grounding in foundational literary and non-literary modernist texts, alongside an emphasis on the body as it appears in literature, sociology, and contemporary prose of the period; we will track changing depictions of sexuality with the emergence of the New Woman, Dorian Gray's relentless quest for new sensations, the "invention" of shell shock as a form of trauma, sartorial fashion, and urban experience. We will read novels, modern poetry, some manifestos, one popular best-seller of the 1920s, and close-read one great painting by the Impressionist Edouard Manet that mingles advertising, prostitution, sensual pleasure, the (proto-) little black dress, and urban spectacle.

Catalog Description: 
Introduces and explores the genealogy, character, and consequences of the modern for textual production and reception. Addresses competing conceptions of modernism and periodizations of modernity, including: preoccupations with novelty/the new; narratives of historical development; temporality; constructions of high and low culture; intersections between aesthetics and politics; and transnationalism.
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
March 21, 2016 - 9:07am