ENGL 200 D: Reading Literary Forms

Queer Mobility in Contemporary Film and Literature

Meeting Time: 
MTWTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Location: 
CDH 717
SLN: 
14045
Instructor:
Profile picture
Ungsan Kim

Syllabus Description:

ENGL 200D: Queer Mobility in Contemporary Film and Literature

 

Instructor: Ungsan Kim                                                                                                Autumn 2015

Email: sankim@uw.edu                                                                          MTWTh 12:30 pm – 01:20 pm

Office Hours: Mon/Tue 01:30pm - 02:30pm at PDL B-35                                              CDH 717

Alt. Office Hours: at Condon Hall after class or by appointment

Our Class Website: https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/988850

 

 

Course Description

 

 

What happens, when queer sexuality, queer culture, and queer people migrate through different spaces and sometimes through different times? And why and how do queer bodies move either nationally or transnationally? In this course, we will explore the different modes of queer mobility in contemporary film and literature. As the commonly used terms such as coming out, outing, or cruising already connote the movement or transformation of bodies or ideas, the issue of mobility is one of the most interesting topics in queer literary and cinema studies. 

By reading and watching contemporary queer canons, we could for instance investigate how the formation of modern metropolitan culture (in contrast to that of a small town) has both nurtured and criminalized queer lives, how mobility has re-conceptualized queer experience, how the experiences of immigrants have contributed to the alternative queer cultures, and how literary and cinematic works of art have responded to this queer mobility. We could also discuss the concept of queerness by exploring these questions: what exactly are queer literature and queer cinema?; how do they differ from more commonly called Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender literature and film?; and what critical potentiality does our "queer" viewpoint on both literature and cinema have?

In addition, we will also practice how to analyze film. Cinema has its own language and style, and we will learn to appreciate the cinematic aesthetics through viewing and analyzing a film scene by scene, or sequence by sequence. Basic terminology for film analysis and its proper usage will be taught in the middle of the quarter.

This course fulfills the "W" requirements, and thus requires students to read and write intensively. Along with two main projects (midterm and final), there will be other short writing assignments.

Readings will include: 
Jessica Hagedorn's Dogeaters (Required / ISBN: 978-0140149043)
Tony Kushner's Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes (Required / ISBN: 978-1559363846)
Jeanette Winterson's “All I Know about Gertrude Stein”
Yiyun Li's “The Princess of Nebraska”

And other short poems and short writings

(PDF version of the short stories will be provided through Canvas)

Tentative film list is as follows:
Happy Together (1997 / dir. Wong Kar-wai)
3 Needles (2005 / dir. Thom Fitzgerald)

Paper Dolls (2006 / dir. Tomer Heymann)
A Girl at My Door (2014 / dir. July Jung)

 

Along with the lecture as well as in-class debates and activities, this class will be structured mostly by your own writing. Your writing will be conducted either with specific guidance or with your own creativity. In both cases, you will be prepared and backed up by the skills you will learn and the texts as well as sources you will get in class.

Note 1: Students should be prepared to spend additional two hours biweekly watching the assigned films. Most films will be affordable through the UW library course reserve or Netflix. For some Asian queer films, I will arrange an extra screening session.

Note 2: This class does NOT require students to have prior knowledge of queer theory, or LGBT, gender and sexuality studies.

 

 

Text and Materials

 

 

  • Jessica Hagedorn's Dogeaters (Required / ISBN: 978-0140149043)
  • Tony Kushner's Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes (Required / ISBN: 978-1559363846)
  • All the other texts apart from the required ones above will be given to you through UW Canvas system: Unless mentioned otherwise, you are required to PRINT OUT a copy of given texts to bring to class.

 

 

Grading

 

 

Your achievements will be evaluated based on your participation in class and achievements in writings and other activities. Your grade will not be determined until the end of the quarter.

 

Participation                               15%

Summary and/or Quizzes              10%

Presentation                                10%

Response Papers (5 times)             15%

Midterm Paper (4-6 pages)                        25%

Final Paper (4-6 pages)                 25%

 

Presentation

You are required to deliver your presentation on the day of your choice. You will sign up for your 5 min. presentation on our second day. The way you deliver your presentation is up to your preference: you may use a traditional way (reading a page paper in front of class) or other media (PowerPoint slides or Prezi). And the presentation should include:

 

  1. A very short plot summary of your assigned reading
  2. Your choice of interesting part(s) in the reading that stand(s) out in terms of narrative, forms, or writing technique.
  3. The reason of your choice: why you want to discuss the part of your choice; why it is interesting; and so on.

 

Participation

Your participation grade depends on a number of criteria.

  • Show up for every class and on time. Your every day participation will be carefully considered and recorded, and your missing classes will affect your participation grade. In the case of an unavoidable absence, you SHOULD contact me beforehand, or at least as soon as possible. (However, in case of emergency or accident with understandable reason, you are allowed to contact me later.)
  • Absence policy: Your attendance is crucial for reading and discussing the assigned texts in depth. Your frequent absences will affect your participation grade. And missing more than four classes (which means a week out of total eleven weeks of this quarter) will affect your grade very much negatively. So, please try to attend the class on a regular basis.
  • Turn in your assignments on time. Missing work will affect your grade adversely. All assignments are to be submitted electronically through UW Canvas website. Late works are usually penalized.
  • Be prepared for each class by doing the assigned reading and completing the assigned writing.
  • Any unnecessary behavior that causes negative class atmosphere will affect your participation grade (e.g. using smart phones during class hours).

 

Learning Outcomes for Courses

 

 

  1. Students are able to contextualize and analyze the materials or topics covered, historically, politically, culturally. (Analytical; Writing; Disciplinary)
  2. Students develop both an appreciation of literature and a lifelong habit of reading. (General Analytical; Disciplinary)
  3. Students are able to perform competent close readings of course texts and similar texts. (Analytical; Disciplinary; Writing)
  4. Students develop more sophisticated discussion and presentation skills in the interest of being better able to construct and defend their own arguments or interpretations. (Analytical; Disciplinary; Writing)

 

 

Course Calendar (Tentative and Subject to Change)

 

* The sign (P) at the end of each text title means you need to print out the text and bring the hard copy to class.

WEEK 1

qUEER, Queerness, queer MOBILITY

homework

Wed 9/30

Course Introduction

 

Thurs 10/1

 

Why Queer?: “Queer” Approach in the Age of Marriage Equality

READ: Z. Leonard. “I Want a Dyke for President …”

WEEK 2

 

 

Mon 10/5

How to Read and Think “Queerly”

READ: J. Chin, “Bangkok”

Tue 10/6

 

Queer and Mobility: Queer Globalization

 

READ: Y. Li, “The Princess of Nebraska” (P)

Wed 10/7

 

Queer and Mobility: Other Queer Mobility Issues

Short Documentary Screening

READ: Y. Li, “The Princess of Nebraska” (P)

Thu 10/8

 

Contestations around Queer Theory

 

READ: M. Warner, “Queer and Then?”

WEEK 3

CASE STUDY: DOGEATERS

 

Mon 10/12

Short Film Screening

Discussion: “Queer”

SUMMARY: A. Jagose, “Queer”

Tue 10/13

Presentation 1

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.22

Wed 10/14

Presentation 2

 

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.46

Thu 10/15

Presentation 3

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.61

WEEK 4

 

 

Mon 10/19

Response discussion

Presentation 4

RESPONSE 1

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.78

Tue 10/20

Presentation 5

 

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.97

Wed 10/21

Presentation 6

 

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.117

Thu 10/22

Presentation 7

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.152

WEEK 5

 

 

Mon 10/26

Discussion: “Queer Diaspora”

RESPONSE 2

SUMMARY: TBD

Tue 10/27

Presentation 8

 

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.187

Wed 10/28

Immigrant Workers, Filipino Diaspora, Queer Diaspora

 

WATCH: T. Heymann, Paper Dolls

Thu 10/29

Discussion: Paper Dolls

 

WEEK 6

 

 

Mon 11/2

Presentation 9

 

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.202

Tue 11/3

Presentation 10

 

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ p.224

Wed 11/4

Presentation 11

READ: J. Hagedorn, Dogeaters ~ the end

Thu 11/5

Introduction to Film Analysis

Key Words in Film Analysis

 

WEEK 7

 

 

Mon 11/9

Paper 1 Due

Film Analysis Case Study: Happy Together

WATCH: Wong, Happy Together

Tue 11/10

Discussion: Happy Together

 

Wed 11/11

VETERANS DAY—NO CLASS

 

Thu 11/12

Film Analysis Case Study

 

WEEK 8

CASE STUDY: ANGELS IN AMERICA

 

Mon 11/16

 

Presentation 12

RESPONSE 3

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 1 Act 1

Tue 11/17

Presentation 13

 

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 1 Act 2

Wed 11/18

Presentation 14

 

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 1 Act 3

Thu 11/19

Presentation 15

 

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 2 Act 1

WEEK 9

wrap up second sequence

 

Mon 11/23

Presentation 16

RESPONSE 4

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 2 Act 2

Tue 11/24

Presentation 17

 

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 2 Act 3

Wed 11/25

Presentation 18

 

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 2 Act 4

Thu 11/26

THANKSGIVING—NO CLASS

 

WEEK 10

don’t forget to give course evaluations

 

Mon 11/30

 

Mobility of Disease, Global Impact of AIDS

WATCH: Fitzgerald, 3 Needles

RESPONSE 5

 

Tue 12/1

Discussion

 

Wed 12/2

 

Presentation 19

 

READ: T. Kushner, Angels in A ~ Part 2 Act 5, Epilogue

Thurs 12/3

 

Presentation 20

 

READ: J. Winterson, “All I Know About Gertrude Stein”

WEEK 11

 

 

Mon 12/7

Queer Urbanity

WATCH: A Girl at My Door

 

Tue 12/8

Film Analysis: A Girl at My Door

Make-Up Presentation(s)

 

Wed 12/9

Writing Conferences

 

Thu 12/10

Paper 2 Due

Writing Conferences

 

 

 

Course Reserve

 

 

Some of the DVDs of the films we will watch and analyze are now being kept as Course Reserve at the Suzzallo Library’s Media Center. To assure everyone’s access, I limited the loan period only to 4 Hours, which means you are required to watch the film either at the library or by using your laptops nearby.

The call numbers are:

  1. DVD KINO 041 / Happy Together
  2. DVD STRAN 018 / Paper Dolls

 

 

Communication

 

 

Office Hours: This is a time where you and I can meet outside class to discuss assignments, questions about the reading, concerns about expectations, interesting ideas you may want to explore, etc. As your instructor, I am here to provide as much learning and help as I can. If for some reason you cannot make the scheduled time, I am happy to make appointments for other times.

 

Email and Canvas Website: It is VERY important that you check your UW e-mail account and the announcement posted on UW Canvas Website on a daily basis during the week. And you MUST also contact me via e-mail if you think you might have to be late or absent for class. During the week I will do my best to respond to you within 24-48 hours. However, please note that I will not discuss grades over email. This issue should be saved for office hours.

 

 

Diversity

 

 

Be respectful of diversity of all kinds: Diversity—in terms of race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, ability/disability, political and cultural beliefs—is vital to creating a classroom community where we can all explore new and different ways of seeing, as well as feel safe to contribute your own points of view. In short, sexist, racist, and homophobic language, bigotry, or assault based on those issues will NOT be tolerated at any time, and will be reported directly to university authority.

 

This class does not assume your gender by your appearance or given name. You have your own rights to be called with the gender pronoun of your choice. Feel free to ask others to call you with pronouns of your preference.

 

 

Plagiarism

 

 

DON’T EVEN TRY IT! Plagiarism, or academic dishonesty, is presenting someone else's ideas or writing as your own. In your writing for this class, you are encouraged to refer to other people's thoughts and writing—as long as you cite them. As a matter of policy, any student found to have plagiarized any piece of writing in this class will be immediately reported to the College of Arts and Sciences for review. Plagiarism includes:

  • a student failing to cite sources of ideas
  • a student failing to cite sources of paraphrased material
  • a student failing to cite sources of specific language and/or passages
  • a student submitting someone else's work as his or her own
  • a student submitting his or her own work that was produced for another class

For more information, visit http://www.washington.edu/uaa/gateway/advising/help/academichonesty.php

 

 

Other Important Things to Keep in Mind

 

 

Accommodations: If you need accommodation of any sort, please let me know so that I can work with the UW Disability Resources for Students Office (DRS, dso@u.washington.edu, 206.543.6450) to provide what you require. I am very willing to take suggestions specific to this class to meet your needs.

 

Counseling Center: UW Counseling Center workshops include a wide range of issues including study skills, thinking about coming out, international students and culture shock, and much more. Check out available resources and workshops at: http://depts.washington.edu/counsels/

 

Career Center: UW Career Center offers career counseling and planning, workshops and career fairs, a listing of part-time jobs on and off campus, and much more. You can visit http://careers.washington.edu/students

 

SARIS: SARIS (Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Information Service) is a confidential starting point for students who have been affected by sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking and sexual harassment. For more information, visit http://washington.edu/students/saris/, or call 206.685.4357

 

Q Center: The University of Washington Q Center builds and facilitates queer (gay, lesbian, bisexual, two-spirit, trans, intersex, questioning, same-gender-loving, allies) academic and social community through education, advocacy, and support services to achieve a socially-just campus in which all people are valued. For more information, visit http://depts.washington.edu/qcenter/

 

 

Writing Center

 

 

  • The CLUE Writing Center in Mary Gates Hall is open Sunday to Thursday from 7pm to midnight. The graduate tutors can help you with your claims, organization, and grammar. You do not need to make an appointment, so arrive early and be prepared to wait. For more information, visit http://depts.washington.edu/clue/.
  • The Odegaard Writing Center is another excellent resource for writers. Tutors in this center can assist writers with their papers from any subject area providing a research-integrated approach to writing instruction. Set up an appointment on http://depts.washington.edu/owrc/.

 

 

Access to Canvas and Instructor’s Office (PDL B-35)

 

 

Canvas Option 1) You can just put our Website address (https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/946771) to your browser, and then log in with your UW net ID.

 

Canvas Option 2) First, log in to your My UW (http://www.uw.edu/), and then, under the Quick Links menu on the right column, you’ll be able to click Canvas LMS.

 

Padelford Hall is located between McMahon and Hall Health Center. Once you get there, go down to the Lower Level (LL) by using elevator or stairs. My office is B-35.

 

 

Campus Safety

 

 

Preventing violence is everyone's responsibility. If you're concerned, tell someone.

  • Always call 911 if you or others may be in danger.

Call 206-685-SAFE (7233) to report non-urgent threats of violence and for referrals to UW counseling and/or safety resources. TTY or VP callers, please call through your preferred relay service.

  • Don't walk alone. Campus safety guards can walk with you on campus after dark. Call Husky NightWalk 206-685-WALK (9255).
  • Stay connected in an emergency with UW Alert. Register your mobile number to receive instant notification of campus emergencies via text and voice messaging. Sign up online at www.washington.edu/alert

For more information visit the SafeCampus website at www.washington.edu/safecampus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I understand and have read the guidelines for the course English 200D. By signing below, I understand that by taking part of this course, I consent to the guidelines and requirements, and will follow them to the best of my ability.

 

 

 

Signature                                 Printed Name                                                 Date

Additional Details:

Autumn Quarter 2015
Course: ENGL 200 D
Instructor: UNGSAN KIM
Queer Mobility in Contemporary Film and Literature

What happens, when queer sexuality, queer culture, and queer people migrate through different spaces and sometimes through different times? And why and how do queer bodies move either nationally or transnationally? In this course, we will explore the different modes of queer mobility in contemporary film and literature. As the commonly used terms such as coming out, outing, or cruising already connote the movement or transformation of bodies or ideas, the issue of mobility is one of the most interesting topics in queer literary and cinema studies.

By reading and watching contemporary queer canons, we could for instance investigate how the formation of modern metropolitan culture (in contrast to that of a small town) has both nurtured and criminalized queer lives, how mobility has re-conceptualized queer experience, how the experiences of immigrants have contributed to the alternative queer cultures, and how literary and cinematic works of art have responded to this queer mobility. We could also discuss the concept of queerness by exploring these questions: what exactly are queer literature and queer cinema?; how do they differ from more commonly called Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender literature and film?; and what critical potentiality does our "queer" viewpoint on both literature and cinema have?

In addition, we will also practice how to analyze film. Cinema has its own language and style, and we will learn to appreciate the cinematic aesthetics through viewing and analyzing a film scene by scene, or sequence by sequence. Basic terminology for film analysis and its proper usage will be taught in the middle of the quarter.

This course fulfills the "W" requirements, and thus requires students to read and write intensively. Along with two main projects (midterm and final), there will be other short writing assignments.

Readings will include:
Jessica Hagedorn's Dogeaters (Required / ISBN: 978-0140149043)
Tony Kushner's Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes (Required / ISBN: 978-1559363846)
Jeanette Winterson's "All I Know about Gertrude Stein"
Yiyun Li's "The Princess of Nebraska"

Tentative Film list is as follows:
Happy Together (1997 / dir. Wong Kar-wai)
3 Needles (2005 / dir. Thom Fitzgerald)
Stateless Things (2011 / dir. Kim Kyung-mook)
Appropriate Behavior (2014 / dir. Desiree Akhavan)

Note 1: Students should be prepared to spend additional two hours biweekly watching the assigned films. Most films will be affordable through the UW library course reserve or Netflix. For some Asian queer films, I will arrange an extra screening session.

Note 2: This class does not require students to have prior knowledge of queer theory, or LGBT, gender and sexuality studies.

Catalog Description: 
Covers techniques and practice in reading and enjoying literature in its various forms: poetry, drama, prose fiction, and film. Examines such features of literary meanings as imagery, characterization, narration, and patterning in sound and sense. Offered: AWSp.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Writing (W)
Other Requirements Met: 
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
March 16, 2016 - 12:38pm