ENGL 528 A: Victorian Literature

Victorian Literature & Culture

Meeting Time: 
TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
Location: 
SAV 140
SLN: 
14192
Instructor:
LaPorte photo
Charles LaPorte

Syllabus Description:

Professor Charles LaPorte (laporte@u.washington.edu)

Fall Quarter 2015

ENGL 528 Victorian Literature & Culture (5, max. 15)

TTH 9:30-11:20 // SAV 140

Office Hours: TTh 11:30-12:20

The Victorian age represents the final stage of what a number of scholars have come to call "middle modernity": the eighteenth and nineteenth century period that gives birth to mass literacy, ideas of human rights (including women's rights and children's rights), industrialization, imperialism, secularization. This course explores the fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose of the Victorian era in conjunction with historical analysis of this emerging modernity. We will pay special attention to questions of literary value, to evolving hierarchies of literary genres, and to fields of cultural production. You can expect to read from the following authors: Matthew Arnold, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Mona Caird, Arthur Hugh Clough, Charles Dickens, Toru Dutt, George Eliot, John Stuart Mill, John Ruskin, Mary Seacole, Alfred Tennyson, and Oscar Wilde.

 

Requirements:

Course grades will be determined by course participation, a brief (5 min) presentation on a topic of relevance to course discussion, a short research assignment to familiarize yourself with some of our databases, and a final paper of 10-12 pages.

 

The paper is designed to be approximately conference length, and indeed might best be thought of as a polished draft for a conference presentation. You will need to turn in a 350-word abstract and a bibliography for this paper by Tuesday, Nov 24.

 

The short research assignment will be in the form of a short review of a contemporary review of a piece of nineteenth-century literature, the aim of which is to encourage you to poke around on our amazing library databases for historical period research. This will be due Thurs, Oct 29.

 

Texts:

* The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed Volume E: The Victorian Age

* Dickens, A Christmas Carol and other Christmas Books (Oxford)

* Seacole, Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands (Penguin)

* Brontë, Shirley (Penguin)

* Wilde, The Major Works (Oxford)

* Barrett Browning, Aurora Leigh (Norton)

* Forster, Howards End (Penguin)

* Coursepack (CP) available at Ram Copy Center

* Selected pdf e-mailings (pdf)

 

 

Proposed Schedule:

Week 1:

October 1: Intro; Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre reprised

 

Week 2:

October 6: Browning, "Porphyria's Lover," "My Last Duchess," "Fra Lippo Lippi"; Alfred Tennyson, "Mariana," "The Lady of Shalott," "The Lotus-Eaters," "Ulysses," "Tithonus"; Barrett Browning, "Runaway Slave at Pilgrim's Point" (Norton); Wilde, The Decay of Lying (Oxford); Armstrong "Rereading Victorian Poetry" (CP) [also LaPorte on Armstrong]

Presentation: The BRANCHcollective.Org Website

Presentation: Ireland enters UK (w/ limited rights for Catholic majority)

 

 

October 8: Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol, The Cricket on the Hearth, "A Visit to Newgate" (norton); Davidoff and Hall, "Separate Spheres" (pdf); Norton Intro (1017-1041), readings for "Industrialism" (1580-1606)

Presentation: Great Reform Bill and Catholic Emancipation

Presentation by Helen: Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

Presentation by Danbee: founding of London University

Snacks by Sarah F.

 

 

Week 3:

October 13: EBB, "Cry of the Children," "To George Sand" (both), Sonnet 43 (norton); Norton readings from "Industrialization" (1556-1580); Norton readings for "The Woman Question" from Sarah Stickney Ellis' Women of England to Florence Nightingale's Cassandra 1607-1629; John Ruskin from The Stones of Venice (norton); John Stuart Mill, "What is Poetry" (norton); Tucker, "The Fix of Form" (cp) [also LaPorte on Tucker in CP]

Presentation by Raja: Slavery Abolition Act of 1833

 

October 15: Charlotte Brontë, Shirley (chs 1-7); Knight, "Religion" from Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature [get on library website]

Snacks by Matt

Presentation: Oxford Movement

Presentation: Chartism

 

Week 4:  

October 20: Charlotte Brontë, Shirley (chs 8-13); Armstrong "What is real in realism?" (CP)

Presentation: The Great Exhibition

Presentation: Continental Revolutions of 1848

 

October 22: Charlotte Brontë, Shirley (chs 14-22); Marcus, "The female relations of Victorian England" (CP)

Presentation by Catherine: Founding of Queens College London, Girton & Newnham Colleges

Snacks by Sarah G.

 

Week 5:  

October 27: Charlotte Brontë, Shirley (chs 23-37); Freedgood, Souvenirs of Sadism (CP

Presentation: Crimean War

 

October 29: Mary Seacole, Wonderful Adventures, chs 1, 8-19; Poon, "Comic Acts of (Be)longing" (cp) Norton readings on "Empire and National Identity" from Macaulay, Russell, Anonymous, Froude, Thomas, Tennyson, Mukharji (1636-1659)

[*500-word Review Review Due*]

Presentation by Sarah S.: Indian Uprising of 1857

Snacks by Sumayyah

 

Week 6:

[November 2: Elaine Freedgood Lecture]

 

November 3:  Barrett Browning, Aurora Leigh I-III;

Presentation by Emily: Contagious Diseases Act of 1864

Snacks by Emily

 

November 5: Aurora Leigh IV-VI

Presentation by Sarah G.: Second Reform Bill

Snacks by Catherine

Week 7:  

November 10: Aurora Leigh VII-IX; Mona Caird, "The Morality of Marriage" (CP)

Presentation by Navid: Married Women's Property Act

Snacks by Sarah S.

 

November 12: Alexander Smith, from A Life-Drama (pdf); Pierre Bourdieu, from The Field of Cultural Production (pdf) [paper topics discussion??]

Presentation by Sumayyah: Origins & Evolution of Detective Fiction

Presentation by Dana: Second Opium War

Snacks by Anna

 

Week 8:

November 17: C. Rossetti from Norton; G. M. Hopkins from Norton; Rudy, "Physiological Poetics" (CP) [also LaPorte response] [Class meets in Library Special Collections for class with Sandra Kroupa, Special Collections Librarian]

 

 

November 19: Matthew Arnold from Norton; Wilde, from The Critic as Artist; Hofer & Scharnhorst, Oscar Wilde in America (CP)

Snacks by Navid

Double Presentation by Sarah F. & Anna: Preraphaelitism

 

 

Week 9:

November 24: from Nineteenth-Century History of English Studies letters to Pall Mall Gazette (cp); Amanda Anderson, from Powers of Distance (pdf);

Snacks by Safi   **Abstracts & Bibliographies Due: 350 words**

 

[November 26: Thanksgiving Weekend]

 

Week 10:

Dec 1: Toru Dutt, all from CP; Gosse, "Introductory Memoir" (CP); Sarah Grand, "The New Woman and the Old" (pdf);

Presentation by Safi: The New Woman

Snacks by Dana

 

December 3: Wilde, Importance of Being Earnest or Lady Windermere's Fan (Oxford)

Presentation by Matt: 1895 Wilde trial

Snacks by Helen

Presentation: Aestheticism

 

Week 11:

[December 7: Jacob Soll Lecture]

December 8: E. M. Forster: Howards End

Snacks by Raja

 

December 10: Howards End

Snacks by Danbee

 

***Final Paper Due Date: Monday, Dec 14 @ 4:00 pm.

 

Additional Details:

The Victorian age represents the final stage of what a number of scholars have come to call "middle modernity": the eighteenth and nineteenth century period that gives birth to mass literacy, ideas of human rights (including women's rights and children's rights), industrialization, imperialism, secularization. This course explores the fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose of the Victorian era in conjunction with historical analysis of this emerging modernity. We will pay special attention to questions of literary value, to evolving hierarchies of literary genres, and to fields of cultural production. You can expect to read from the following authors: Matthew Arnold, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Mona Caird, Arthur Hugh Clough, Charles Dickens, Toru Dutt, George Eliot, John Stuart Mill, John Ruskin, Mary Seacole, Alfred Tennyson, and Oscar Wilde. We will also look at the nineteenth-century British reception of American literature, such as Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass. Course grades will be determined by course participation, a brief presentation on a topic of relevance to course discussion, a short research assignment to familiarize yourself with some of our UW Library databases, and a final paper of 10-12 pages.

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Last updated: 
March 16, 2016 - 12:39pm