ENGL 372 A: World Englishes

Meeting Time: 
MW 12:30pm - 2:20pm
Location: 
CHL 015
SLN: 
13869
Instructor:
Nancy Bou Ayash
Nancy Bou Ayash

Syllabus Description:

English 372 Syllabus (Spring 2015).docxThis course explores the ways major historical, sociopolitical, and economic developments have led to the spread of English as a world language and the subsequent emergence of new Englishes, refashioned existent local languages, and transformed communicative patterns and language relations in different parts of the world. Drawing on a wide range of artifacts (such as emails, social media interactions, speech transcripts, newspapers, hip hop lyrics, shop signs, advertisements, etc.), we will seek to explore the complexity of established and emerging Englishes in diverse locations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. By pursuing comparative explorations of various Englishes, we will closely interrogate how these unique ways of using English shape and are shaped by locally specific influences of social, political, ideological and linguistic relations.

 

 

 

 

 

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Additional Details:

This course explores the ways major historical, sociopolitical, and economic developments have led to the spread of English as a world language and the subsequent emergence of new Englishes, refashioned existent local languages, and transformed communicative patterns and language relations in different parts of the world. Drawing on a wide range of artifacts (such as emails, social media interactions, speech transcripts, newspapers, hip hop lyrics, shop signs, advertisements, etc.), we will seek to explore the complexity of established and emerging Englishes in diverse locations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. By pursuing comparative explorations of various Englishes, we will closely interrogate how these unique ways of using English shape and are shaped by locally specific influences of social, political, ideological and linguistic relations.

Catalog Description: 
Examines historical, linguistic, economic, and sociopolitical forces involved in the diversification of Global/New Englishes. Attention to changing power relations, language hierarchies, and inequalities associated with the teaching, learning, and use of English. Explores current debates on linguistic imperialism and resistance, concepts of 'mother tongue', nativeness, comprehensibility/intelligibility judgments, and language ownership. Prerequisite: either ENGL 370, LING 200, or LING 400.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Other Requirements Met: 
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
March 16, 2016 - 11:20am