EWP Course Outcomes - 100-level courses

Outcome 1

To compose strategically for a variety of audiences and contexts, both within and outside the university, by

  • recognizing how different elements of a rhetorical situation matter for the task at hand and affect the options for composing and distributing texts;
  • coordinating, negotiating, and experimenting with various aspects of composing—such as genre, content, conventions, style, language, organization, appeals, media, timing, and design—for diverse rhetorical effects tailored to the given audience, purpose, and situation; and
  • assessing and articulating the rationale for and effects of composing choices.

Outcome 2

To work strategically with complex information in order to generate and support inquiry by

  • reading, analyzing, and synthesizing a diverse range of texts and understanding the situations in which those texts are participating;
  • using reading and writing strategies to craft research questions that explore and respond to complex ideas and situations;
  • gathering, evaluating, and making purposeful use of primary and secondary materials appropriate for the writing goals, audience, genre, and context;
  • creating a ‘conversation’—identifying and engaging with meaningful patterns across ideas, texts, experiences, and situations; and
  • using citation styles appropriate for the genre and context.

Outcome 3

To craft persuasive, complex, inquiry-driven arguments that matter by

  • considering, incorporating, and responding to different points of view while developing one’s own position;
  • engaging in analysis—the close scrutiny and examination of evidence, claims, and assumptions—to explore and support a line of inquiry;
  • understanding and accounting for the stakes and consequences of various arguments for diverse audiences and within ongoing conversations and contexts; and
  • designing/organizing with respect to the demands of the genre, situation, audience, and purpose.

Outcome 4

To practice composing as a recursive, collaborative process and to develop flexible strategies for revising throughout the composition process by

  • engaging in a variety of (re)visioning techniques, including (re)brainstorming, (re)drafting, (re)reading, (re)writing, (re)thinking, and editing;
  • giving, receiving, interpreting, and incorporating constructive feedback; and
  • refining and nuancing composition choices for delivery to intended audiences in a manner consonant with the genre, situation, and desired rhetorical effects and meanings.

PDF Version