Recent News

The Expository Writing Program and Critical Classrooms invites you to to join Teacher Talk this Friday, October 18th from 10-11:30 facilitated by your colleagues: Anselma Prihandita & Renee Lynch. Teacher Talk is a discussion series with the goal of creating a space for graduate instructors and faculty to come together and share resources, discuss praxis, and present innovative practices. This is a fantastic opportunity for both new and returning instructors to collaborate with others in... Read more
The Expository Writing Program and Critical Classrooms invites you to join Teacher Talk this Friday from 10-11:30. Teacher Talk is a discussion series with the goal of creating a space for graduate instructors and faculty to come together and share resources, discuss praxis, and present innovative practices. This is a fantastic opportunity for both new and returning instructors to collaborate with others in the department and our teaching community. Please see the upcoming event.   Teacher Talk... Read more
Teacher Talk is a pedagogy workshop and conversation series that seeks to provide a space for graduate instructors, faculty, and staff to share innovative and equitable practices, discuss praxis, and build a supportive teaching community. Housed in the Expository Writing Program (EWP) as part of the Critical Classroom Series, Teacher Talk hosts interactive events that run 60-90 minutes, including guided discussions, panels, break-out sessions, roundtables, workshops, and resource sharing.... Read more
After four years of research, archiving, interviewing, shooting, editing, and preparation, Frances McCue's Where the House Was is finally making its premiere at the Northwest Film Forum’s Local Sightings Film Festival. Click here for more information. Read more about the film on the Team Hugo House website. The film is also profiled on the Simpson... Read more
Professor Shawn Wong is featured in this Seattle Times article for his role in the publication of John Okada's classic novel No-No Boy, which is now at the center of a copyright controversy after its re-publication. UW faculty member Vince Schleitwiler also writes about the fascinating... Read more
In this article by Denise Grollmus, Professor Joe Butwin reflects on how his academic career always led him back to his family roots. Read more here.
The Expository Writing Committee (Matthews, Simmons-O'Neill, Rai) is pleased to announce the recipients of our department's awards for Graduate Students teaching in English Department Writing Programs. Winner of the Richard J. Dunn First Year Teaching Award (English 131) is Kaelie Giffel. Honorable Mention for the Dunn is Brittney Frantece. Co-Winners of the Joan Webber Award for Outstanding Teaching in the Writing Programs by a Graduate Student are... Read more
On Monday June 3rd, Ahmad A. Alharthi and Holly Shelton will be facilitating a discussion titled: "What Might a Translingual Pedagogy Look Like?" for the Teacher Talk Series. When: 10:00-11:30 (attendees may arrive late or leave early if needed) Where: Simpson Center CMU 202 Below is a description of this teacher talk's focus: The scholarship on translingualism strongly insists that no two classes can be the same (and, indeed, no two students are alike) and... Read more
Anis Bawarshi
As I wind down my year as Acting Chair, I am reminded of a poem by Lucille Clifton that a colleague shared with me soon after my birthday: “i am running into a new year/ and the old years blow back/ like a wind/ that i catch in my hair/ like strong fingers like/ all my old promises and/ it will be hard to let go/ of what i said to myself/ about myself/ when i was sixteen and/ twenty-six and thirty-six/ even forty-six but/ i am running into a new year/ and i beg what i love and/ i leave to... Read more
Wayne Burns Panzaic Principle
Profile of UW English Professor Wayne Burns (1916-2012) by USNA English Professor Emeritus John M. Hill Dr. John M. Hill’s (BA ’66, PhD ’71) first academic appointment  after leaving the UW English Department with his PhD was at Smith College, where he taught for a few years while publishing essays on Spenser, Chaucer, language issues in medieval English poetry, Swift’s satire of natural philosophers, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (a psychological... Read more

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